Alexandre Singh: The Humans

Sprüth Magers, London

24 January – 29 March 2014

Alexandre Singh, The Humans, insallation view. Image courtesy Sprueth Magers.

Alexandre Singh, The Humans, insallation view. Image courtesy Sprueth Magers.

It all sounds like so much fun. A reworking of ancient Greek comedies, with sculptor Charles Ray epitomised as a Prospero-like figure ‘seeking,’ as he says, ‘pure form in geometry’ on an island supposedly run by a deity who communicates through an air conditioner and a Nespresso machine. His demigod offspring try to disrupt celestial machinations, only to bring about the calamitous creation of humanity itself. Alexandre Singh’s three-hour play The Humans (2013; video 2014) has singing, dancing, existentialism and toilet humour, and oodles of nods to The Tempest (1610–11), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1590–96), The Jungle Book (1967) and Dumbo (1941). But as Singh has said himself, ‘I often prefer reading plays to seeing them.’ Contemporary comedic musical dealing with theological and philosophical issues it is. The Book of Mormon (2011) it is not.

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